POV: Get the Boss to Buy In

Point-of-View: Get the Boss to Buy In Harvard Business Review (HBR) January/February 2015 Summary: Organizations don’t prosper unless managers in the middle ranks promote the need for change. Yet for many reasons they may not voice their ideas and concerns. Most managers struggle to sell their ideas to executives at the top. They find it difficult to raise issues early and be invited to have conversations at a “strategic” level. Managers must time & tailor their pitch to key stakeholders, Read More …

POV: Collaborative Distractions

Point-of-View: Collaborative Overload Harvard Business Review (HBR) January/February 2016 Summary: Time used in collaborative activities (meetings, email, etc.) has grown by 50% or more. At many companies, it’s 80% of the day, leaving little time for individuals to complete their own work. There are three types of “collaborative resources”. Informational (can be recorded and passed on), Social (awareness and access within a network), and Personal (one’s own time and energy). Informational and social resources are infinite and can be shared Read More …

STRONG FINISH and FAST START

STRONG FINISH and FAST START Seems like yesterday everyone was kicking off 2015.  Where did the year go?  For some, it was a great year, and for others not so great. Regardless, transitions are a time to reflect.  What worked?  What didn’t work?  What needs to change? I thought a bit of humor would be welcomed to help jump start your process of reflection.   Hopefully it will strike a chord and not hit a nerve…  😉 Here is to Read More …

POV: Harvard Business Review – Outsmart Your Own Biases.

Point-of-View: Outsmart Your Own Biases Harvard Business Review (HBR) May 2015 Summary: Dangerous to rely too heavily on what experts call System 1 thinking – automatic judgments from associations stored in memory – instead of logically working through the information that’s readily available (System 2 thinking). System 2 thinking can also be dangerous because of deliberate reasoning gone awry, cognitive limitations, or laziness. Everyone is susceptible to such biases, especially when we are fatigued, stressed, or multi-tasking. Out of survival Read More …

POV: Harvard Business Review – Making the Consensus Sale

Point-of-View: Making the Consensus Sale Harvard Business Review (HBR) March 2015 Summary: On average 5.4 people have to formally sign-off on B2B purchases. Best way to build customer consensus isn’t to do a better job of connecting individual customer stakeholders to the supplier but to more effectively connect customer stakeholders to one another. Problem definition and solution identification are much more difficult for buyers to reach consensus than supplier selection. Suppliers focus too much on supplier selection. By the time Read More …

POV: Inside the Box

You Decide… Brainstorming (outside the box) or Brainforming (inside the box) by Drew Boyd and Jacob Goldenberg Summary: We are all creatures of habits. Habits simplify our lives by triggering familiar thoughts and actions to get us thru the day – getting up, eating breakfast, going to work, making decisions. Behind every habit is a template – a repeatable and “code able” pattern. Templates “limit” us in a way to boost our productive/creative output. Highly effective (intuitive) people don’t realize Read More …

POV: How to save the world (or at least yourself) from bad meetings

When we find ourselves nodding along with an article, or screaming in disagreement, we start a dialogue. This one hit home. Based on David Grady’s TED Talk: How to save the world (or at least yourself) from bad meetings, here’s our point-of view (POV). We’re nodding with you, David! David Grady’s TED Talk: How to save the world (or at least yourself) from bad meetings SUMMARY OF DAVID’S TALK  We would not let our peers steal our chair from our office, yet Read More …

POV Harvard Business Review: The Effective Decision

Point-of-View: The Effective Decision Harvard Business Review (HBR) January/February 1967 Summary: Every decision is a risk-taking judgment. Effective executives make decisions as a systematic process with clearly defined elements in a distinct sequence of steps. Decision-Making Process: classify the type of problem (generic, unique), define the problem, specify the answer (must accomplish), decide what is right (not acceptable), build into the decision the action to carry It out, test the validity of the decision (vs. actual course of events) Most Read More …

Groundhog Zero

As a kid, I hated the movie Groundhog Day. Most of the movie was the same scene, over, and over, and over, again. What a waste of time! 96% of critics, and most people I knew, disagreed with me. When the film was released on video, my parents bought a copy. My complaints were dismissed to youth: “Kelsey, it is a deep movie – an attempt to answer the meaning of life! One day, you’ll understand.” I responded with my standard, disapproving Read More …